corporate trust Tag

By Neil Davy Communications in a new era of responsible business Protecting balance sheets, supply chains, reputations, jobs and people. It’s what we’ve all been thinking about, talking about, preoccupied with. Survival. When we emerge from this pandemic the relationships and interdependencies between businesses, investors, governments and society - between all of us - will have changed inexorably. And the role of communication in establishing and sustaining those relationships and interactions will have changed too. Corporate philanthropy, CSR, community programmes and stepping-up in times of crisis are important and commendable, but simply talking about ‘doing good’ won’t be good enough. Those who prosper beyond the crisis will be businesses who can talk credibly about how they contribute to society and the wider world in a more meaningful and lasting way. It’s become painfully clear over recent weeks that those businesses for whom profit is an outcome of (not the reason for) what they do, who enhance...

By Steve Marinker, Partner at Powerscourt Notes from a Spare Room This isn’t Crisis Management; this is Contagion Comms. The COVID-19 disaster has challenged the PR industry like nothing before. While dealing with our own upheavals - lockdown, fear of illness, the spectre of redundancy – PR consultants have been advising clients as they deal with events moving at a pace few are equipped to handle. Decisions that would normally take months are being made in minutes;  cast-iron certainties melt in an instant; the useful data point we clung to this morning is discredited bunkum by lunchtime. It’s been mentally exhausting, ethically challenging, and – I have to confess - rather exhilarating. When this is over, we’ll all have our war stories. Me? I’ve spent the last fortnight advising retail clients as they respond to fast-changing, often baffling Government advice. What’s essential, what is not?. How safe is safe? Is it better to protect livelihoods...

By Steve Marinker, Head of Corporate,  Powerscourt, an independent strategic communications consultancy No one understands us If there is one plaintive cry I have heard from clients more than any other, it’s that that their organisations are not properly understood. Time and again I hear the frustration. If only our business model was better understood; if only commentators acknowledged the complexities of our operating environment; if only the quality of our people was properly appreciated; if only our scale advantages were better known … then the world would be a better place. When I’m asked to crystallise what it is that PR people do, I no longer talk about communications or managing perceptions or stakeholder engagement, or any of those good things. Because increasingly I see these as tactics which serve a higher purpose, which is to improve understanding. Certainly, that’s how we talk about Powerscourt now – we exist to help our clients be better...

by Steve Marinker, Head of Corporate at Powerscourt Five tips for getting it right The deadline for submitting Gender Pay Gap data is just four weeks away, but according to the Financial Times only one in six companies had uploaded its data to the Government portal by last weekend, meaning there is likely to be an almighty last-minute scramble. Plans for communicating Gender Pay Gap data are likely to be well advanced, but Powerscourt has prepared this short primer to help businesses fine tune, or at least sense-check, their thinking. 1. Gender Balance The revelation that female BBC news presenters are paid less than their male counterparts has routinely, but wrongly, been described as an example of the Gender Pay Gap. Most companies that have reported so far have been at pains to point out that the Gender Pay Gap has nothing to do with equal pay, but that hasn’t stopped the two terms being conflated. By...

A guest post by Steve Marinker. ‘We put customers at the heart of everything we do’. Hands up if you’ve ever written these words in a statement, press release, Q&A, corporate narrative, annual report or other piece of communication. I have, and I wish I hadn’t. In fact I have become a zealot, searching and destroying this kind of nonsense whenever I encounter it. Of course you bloody well put customers at the heart of everything you do! What kind of organisation doesn’t? I see claims of ‘customer centricity’ in every sector, but it amuses me most in healthcare where the seemingly tautological notion of ‘patient-centred healthcare’ is rife. What other kind of healthcare is there, I asked innocently when I started working in the sector two decades ago. The scales soon fell from my eyes. Historically the lifestyle of doctors, the convenience of administrators, the reputation of researchers and expectations of investors, have all taken precedence over the...

This blog post was written by Steve Marinker. There is a crisis in corporate trust. We read about it every day. Consumers have lost faith in big business thanks to multiple corporate betrayals ranging from aggressive tax avoidance to child labour. They’re even losing faith in charities thanks to reported scandals at Kids Company and elsewhere. What is corporate trust? But what does the idea of trust in a corporation actually mean? Consumers may profess in surveys to trust Marks & Spencer or Boots, just as they may declare not to trust any utility provider you care to name. But are these really assessments of corporate integrity and honour? When I was a child I told my father I despised beetroot. You can’t despise beetroot he explained. You may dislike it but to be despised beetroot must be capable of despicable character traits such as selfishness or cowardice or dishonesty. Can corporations be selfish, cowardly and...